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Talladega National Forest

March 4, 2021

Talladega National Forest covers some 600 square miles of the Appalachian Mountains in Alabama. It is mountainous with great swathes of pine forest covering much of the area. It is home to coyote, quail, wild turkey, raccoon, rabbit and deer. There are also two species of fox and two of squirrel. The forest is divided into two distinct areas – Oakmulgee District dominated by pine and oak with gentle slopes and stream terraces and flat plains. The Talladega and Shoal Creek districts are more mountainous and the forests here are more mixed.

History of Talladega National Forest

The area that today is the Talladega National Forest was purchased by the US government in the 1930s. Before that it was a heavily logged area and as a result had suffered erosion and deforestation. Much of the damage has been repaired by extensive planting and forest management.

What is there to do in the Forest?

Horse Back Riding.

In the Shoal Creek District the Piedmont Loop and the Sweetwater Loop allow for some great horse riding. Book your ride at the Warden Station Horse Camp. Blue horseshoes mark the Piedmont Loop and yellow ones mark the Sweetwater Loop.

Camping

There are campsites situated throughout the Forest. Some are primitive campsites with very basic facilities, while others are better provisioned. Disabled hunters have one campsite specifically for them, the Big Oak Physically Disabled Hunting Camp. Access to this site is easier than others. It has 10 pitches and there is a toilet facility.

Campsites that are reasonably easy to access also are sited at Payne Lake, Pine Glen and Coleman Lake Recreation Areas. Use these as bases for hiking and fishing expeditions.

Fishing

One great recommendation for fishing in the Forest is at Terrapin Creek. There are plenty of opportunities as the creek divides into two – the South Fork and the Little Terrapin Creek. Other rivers and streams offer fishing too, with catfish, bream and bass among the fish available.

Hiking

The Forest offers over 340 miles of hiking trails. There is so much to see that hiking is the most popular of all the activities in the park. Alltrails.com identifies 29 superb trails for both hiking and trail running.

Mountain Biking

There are plenty of trails suitable for mountain biking. We recommend the spectacular Sylaward Biking Trail.

Wildlife Watching and Birding

The opportunities to see a huge range of wildlife are legion. Birders will love the variety and quantity of birds to see.

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Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

May 28, 2020

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Uncategorized

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

May 28, 2020

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Uncategorized

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

May 28, 2020

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.